Revisiting…Pulp Fiction (1994)

Tarantino’s colossal opus is a near perfect movie. Although it unquestionably defined an era, it refuses to be tied to one, and in a bizarre journey via a 50s themed cafe known as Jack Rabbit Slims, we follow an Afro-wielding gangster and his 70s icon cohort, while an eclectic range of popular music traverses four decades, resulting in an enduring abstraction of time and place…

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Revisiting . . . Fargo (1996)

In many ways Fargo is the star of Fargo.

So detached from the savagery of modern life are its people that their salt-of-the-earth simplicity comes across as quite bizarre, and when contrasted with the stark and often brutal violence of the movie’s outsiders, we are plunged into an odyssey that is at once perverse and comical, exactly the kind of prodigious juxtapose that has made the Coen brothers so uniquely prominent as both writers and directors…

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Revisiting . . . Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977)

“A long time ago . . . in a galaxy far, far away . . .”

For me, and many others, that ‘long time ago’ was a childhood defined by the exploits of Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and their Guardians of the Galaxy style, dysfunctional group of androids, wookies, rapscallions and royalty. That single line also exemplifies the ‘Once Upon a Time’ introduction of many a fairy tale as our young farm boy, who dreams of joining the rebellion, suddenly finds himself rescuing the princess and defeating the evil wizard . . .

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Revisiting . . . Withnail and I (1987)

Withnail and I is not only one of the finest British comedies ever put to celluloid, it is one of the most hilarious and poignant of the entire genre…

It is the story of a scathing drunkard and his unfortunate sidekick; two out of work actors living in a squalid Georgian flat in Camden Town, London. The movie is set at the tail end of ‘the greatest decade in the history of mankind’ and as spaced-out drug dealer and uninvited frequenter Danny so aptly points out, ‘there’s gonna be a lot of refugees’. . .

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Revisiting . . . The Dead Zone (1983)

As a movie, The Dead Zone is not without its flaws, but it proves extremely relevant in regards to today’s political climate.

Although not as high profile as many other Stephen King adaptions, it is one of most loyal in terms of how it translates to the screen, and is certainly one of the most underappreciated, in spite of its often clunky pacing and superfluous content. The movie is directed by none other than David Cronenberg, a man who has long since reached a mainstream audience, although even his more high-profile pictures could never really be classed as conventional…

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Revisiting . . . A Simple Plan (1998)

A Simple Plan is one of those movies that is destined to be forgotten.

This is nothing out of the ordinary. There are lots of films that disappear from the public consciousness, but few of them are as enjoyable as this one, and even fewer can boast such an exceptional cast or a director as consistent as horror icon Sam Raimi, who makes something of a departure from his usual comic book style with this taut and suspenseful thriller . . .

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