Revisiting…Pulp Fiction (1994)

Tarantino’s colossal opus is a near perfect movie. Although it unquestionably defined an era, it refuses to be tied to one, and in a bizarre journey via a 50s themed cafe known as Jack Rabbit Slims, we follow an Afro-wielding gangster and his 70s icon cohort, while an eclectic range of popular music traverses four decades, resulting in an enduring abstraction of time and place…

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Revisiting . . . The Dead Zone (1983)

As a movie, The Dead Zone is not without its flaws, but it proves extremely relevant in regards to today’s political climate.

Although not as high profile as many other Stephen King adaptions, it is one of most loyal in terms of how it translates to the screen, and is certainly one of the most underappreciated, in spite of its often clunky pacing and superfluous content. The movie is directed by none other than David Cronenberg, a man who has long since reached a mainstream audience, although even his more high-profile pictures could never really be classed as conventional…

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Revisiting . . . True Romance (1993)

In 1995 actors and directors were queuing up to work with a young prodigy by the name of Quentin Tarantino.

In 1992 he gave us the star-studded heist flick Reservoir Dogs, a near scene-for-scene remake of the 1985 Hong Kong action film City on Fire, which although veiled with western pop culture references inspired cries of plagiarism from educated critics across the globe.

Nevertheless, there was no doubting QT’s talent and potential…

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Revisiting . . . A View to a Kill (1985)

In my opinion, A View to a Kill gets something of a bad rap.

Sure, there are plenty of things to decry in regards to Roger Moore’s seventh and final outing as the irrepressible James Bond, but there is also a lot going for the movie, and in my opinion a large percentage of those critics who panned it beyond salvation are invariably children of the 1950s – those who can’t look past Sean Connery as the one and only 007…

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