Revisiting…Live and Let Die (1973)

At times, Live and Let Die is almost like an anti-blaxploitation movie.

Of course, it is very much a product of its time, and there is no serious slight intended, but watching it you are reminded of just how far society has come in regards to its representation of ethnic groups, so far that its often prejudiced content now comes across as laughable rather than offensive. Here, the movie’s superfly brothers are slick, drug-dealing criminals who occasionally dabble in voodoo, but classic Bond was always a franchise steeped in sweeping stereotypes, regardless of race of creed. Go back far enough, and there is reason enough for everyone to be offended…

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Revisiting…Aliens (1986)

A sequel that lives up to an original picture is a rare thing indeed. Even rarer is one that in some ways surpasses it, but James Cameron seems to have the formula down to a tee.

In 1991 he in many ways bested his own sci-fi epic The Terminator with Terminator 2: Judgement Day, and a few years prior he took Ridley Scott’s seminal space horror Alien and made Aliens, which for many is the superior movie of the franchise.

So what exactly makes Cameron such an expert in delivering top-notch sequels…

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Revisiting…True Romance (1993)

In 1995 actors and directors were queuing up to work with a young prodigy by the name of Quentin Tarantino.

In 1992 he gave us the star-studded heist flick Reservoir Dogs, a near scene-for-scene remake of the 1985 Hong Kong action film City on Fire, which although veiled with western pop culture references inspired cries of plagiarism from educated critics across the globe.

Nevertheless, there was no doubting QT’s talent and potential…

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Revisiting…Boyz n the Hood (1991)

Almost thirty years have passed since the release of John Singleton’s controversial drama, and the movie has lost none of its power. In fact, it is hard to imagine a film of its nature existing in today’s censored climate.

Back in 1991, the infamous L.A. riots were just around the corner, and rap was more than just a vehicle for cynical, white-collar marketing. Thanks to certain creative freedoms, the racially oppressed still had something of a mainstream voice, and movies were allowed to champion unpopular opinions…

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Revisiting…Sexy Beast (2000)

The opening scene of Sexy Beast is one of great comical foreboding.

Retired safe-cracker Gal, played with subtle potency by the wonderful Ray Winstone, is your typical Brit abroad, a red lobster baking in the Spanish heat and loving every minute of it. His dysfunctional family consists of his beloved partner Dee Dee, an ex porn star with just as much reason to escape her homeland, another gangland couple with a similarly unfortunate past, and a young Spanish boy who performs chores around Gal’s villa with the adoring smile of an adulating son…

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Revisiting…The Naked Gun Trilogy

Airplane will always be the original Zucker/Abrahams absurdity, and there were a few other notable efforts in-between, but for me The Naked Gun is the pinnacle of their deadpan genius, and there is nothing you can suggest that will ever change my mind.

There are perhaps a number of reasons for my particular bias, but the most telling is the fact that I saw The Naked Gun long before I did its puerile predecessor, and by the time I got around to finally seeing Airplane – of which I had acquired lofty expectations – the comedy seemed just a little watered down by comparison…

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