Revisiting . . . Stephen King’s IT (1990)

In many ways, time has not been kind to Tommy Lee Wallace’s 1990 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel, IT.

Judged in cinematic terms, it is a largely hackneyed portrayal with paper-thin characterisation, second rate acting and contrived storytelling, while the movie tends to gravitate towards melodrama on more than one occasion. Of course, there was no theatrical release for what was a two part TV mini-series, and when you take into account the period in which it was made, the budget it was allotted a the tools at its disposal, you can forgive many of those flaws . . .

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Revisiting . . . The Dead Zone (1983)

As a movie, The Dead Zone is not without its flaws, but it proves extremely relevant in regards to today’s political climate.

Although not as high profile as many other Stephen King adaptions, it is one of most loyal in terms of how it translates to the screen, and is certainly one of the most underappreciated, in spite of its often clunky pacing and superfluous content. The movie is directed by none other than David Cronenberg, a man who has long since reached a mainstream audience, although even his more high-profile pictures could never really be classed as conventional…

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VHS Revival’s Bizarre Movie Posters – Part One

Promotional posters are an essential part of any successful movie. Not only do they offer the public its first visual insight into an upcoming picture, they help to promote its genre and theme, as well as the marquee attractions whose job it is to convince eager fans to part with their hard-earned cash.

Posters can make or break a movie. From the crudely drawn, minimalist posters of the late 19th century, the art form would grow in both scope and impact, employing illustrators and artists as visual connotations and conceptualization came to the forefront, altering the process from mere advertising to storytelling and subliminal appeal…

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Arnie’s Top 10 Movie Puns – Part One

When it comes iconic figures, there are none more recognisable than Arnold Schwarzenegger. Born to stringent communist parents in a small town with a population of just over 2,000, Arnie would burst to fame in bodybuilding documentary Pumping Iron. With his docile accent, Arnold hardly seemed like a superstar in the making, but next to his musclebound co-stars the cocksure kid from Thal shone brightest. In spite of his oppressed upbringing Arnold was frank, confident, quick-witted and erudite – all of the qualities required to succeed as a likeable mainstream presence…

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VHS Revival’s Greatest Movie Taglines

Taglines are an essential part of any promotional package. Along with posters and teaser trailers, their aim is to sell a movie without giving too much away. A great movie tagline says an awful lot using very little. It is clever and memorable, and along with its accompanying image sells a picture to its potential audience by establishing tone and genre, giving you an idea of what you might be able to expect, while unlocking your imagination to what might lie beyond…

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Sleepwalkers (1992)

Back in the early ’90s the horror genre began to look decidedly second-rate.

Part of this was due to the increasing availability of CGI for low budget movie makers, its bargain basement lows becoming more widespread and accessible. Another, perhaps more telling part, was the plethora of made-for-TV Stephen King adaptions, their overabundance flooding VHS stores at a rate fast approaching that of his fiction…

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Revisiting . . . Stand By Me (1986)

It is perhaps ironic that one of the most nostalgic movies of the 1980s acquires its sense of sentimentality from an entirely different era.

Based on Stephen King’s short story The Body, Stand by Me is an intoxicating ode to the ’50s with a tragic underbelly that belies the myth of what on the surface of things could be considered simpler times…

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