Revisiting…Live and Let Die (1973)

At times, Live and Let Die is almost like an anti-blaxploitation movie.

Of course, it is very much a product of its time, and there is no serious slight intended, but watching it you are reminded of just how far society has come in regards to its representation of ethnic groups, so far that its often prejudiced content now comes across as laughable rather than offensive. Here, the movie’s superfly brothers are slick, drug-dealing criminals who occasionally dabble in voodoo, but classic Bond was always a franchise steeped in sweeping stereotypes, regardless of race of creed. Go back far enough, and there is reason enough for everyone to be offended…

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VHS Revival’s Bizarre Movie Posters – Part One

Promotional posters are an essential part of any successful movie. Not only do they offer the public its first visual insight into an upcoming picture, they help to promote its genre and theme, as well as the marquee attractions whose job it is to convince eager fans to part with their hard-earned cash.

Posters can make or break a movie. From the crudely drawn, minimalist posters of the late 19th century, the art form would grow in both scope and impact, employing illustrators and artists as visual connotations and conceptualization came to the forefront, altering the process from mere advertising to storytelling and subliminal appeal…

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On Deadly Ground (1994)

There is a story about Steven Seagal which may or may not shock you.

One day an executive walked into Seagal’s trailer and found the star weeping. ‘Oh, I’m reading this script,’ Seagal explained, his head shaking in disbelief. ‘It’s the most incredible script I’ve ever read.’

‘That’s fantastic,’ the executive said, ‘Who wrote it?’

‘I did,’ the star replied.

It is this kind of self-gratifying smugness that permeates Seagal’s directorial debut

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Saving the World, One Hunk at a Time.

Recently, I have noticed that some cable television outlets have taken to showing disaster movies.

I don’t know whether to be alarmed or amused by their schedule, but it started the old gears turning in my head. Why is it that when an impending cataclysm is looming Hollywood feels the need to turn to a beefcake-o-rama? Look, I am not going on a feminist rant or anything, but just think about it: besides Deep Impact, has there ever been a crisis thriller helmed by a woman?

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Breeders (1986)

Breeders is like one of those old monster movies with a giant erection.

Another in a long line of exploitation flicks given the bluray treatment, it is the story of a giant fly who sets about raping a cast of airheaded delectables with the intention of expanding its species. Able to take the form of any human it comes into contact with, it seeks out virgin victims and impregnates them with a black, gooey substance, while using acid to burn them for reasons which are never quite explained.

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Waterworld (1995)

Poor Kevin Reynolds.

After experiencing huge success with 1991’s Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, he would be handed a budget of $175,000,000 to direct dystopian spectacular Waterworld, and although that sum may seem paltry by today’s standards, this was more than a quarter of a century ago, and at the time it constituted the world’s most expensive movie, a fact made so apparent in the mainstream media that the production was almost bound to fail, and in many quarters encouraged to…

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