Darkman (1990)

As comic book adaptations go, Sam Raimi’s Darkman released in 1990, on the back of an inspired marketing campaign that queried the origin of the character by posing the question ‘Who Is Darkman?’ was one of the most interesting of the era. This was despite the fact it was scripted from an original story idea by The Evil Dead helmer as opposed to an actual comic book from the period it pays homage to.

Drawing on the Universal horror movies of the 1930s, in particular the celebrated oeuvre of James Whale, as well as The Shadow, The Phantom of the Opera and a veritable glut of monster and comic book staples, the film would […]

Read Article →

Halloween Resurrection (2002)

Much has been made about what New Line Cinema did to the Friday the 13th franchise.

In their pursuit of a money-spinning Freddy vs Jason crossover they ignored the key ingredient of the series: simple repetition. The Friday the 13th was the first horror series to make the ‘more of the same’ concept key to its success, but with their body-swapping debut Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday all that went out of the window. Some feel their second effort Jason X was another insult to the Paramount formula, while others disagree. Whatever you may think, though it shot Jason into space and tried something novel for the most part it went back to basics and retained many of the ingredients that made the original series a success. The same can not be said about Dimension Films […]

Read Article →

The People Under the Stairs (1991)

Wes Craven would front some screwball productions during his time as a mainstream horror director.

Perhaps the most famous of these was sci-fi/horror mash-up Deadly Friend, the story of a pallid robotics whizz-kid who uses a microchip to Frankenstein his late girlfriend with typically dire consequences. Craven would receive widespread criticism for his efforts, particularly for a series of nightmare sequences that were distinctly at odds with […]

Read Article →

Memoirs of An Invisible Man (1992)

In the early 90s, John Carpenter, after a break from filmmaking following the commercial ambivalence indie productions Prince of Darkness and They Live were met with in cinemas, decided to take a punt on directing a studio flick again.

The film, Carpenter’s first studio effort since the mid-eighties, was a mainstream Hollywood movie, produced by Chevy Chase, which the actor was using to springboard into drama. Chase wanted the film to have a solemn flavour. So he brought in gun-for-hire John Carpenter to direct, who was hired in the wake of Ivan Reitman, who reportedly disagreed with Chase on what the tone of the film should be […]

Read Article →