Revisiting . . . Juice (1992)

Back in 1991, director John Singleton single-handedly changed the face of cinema.

Not only did his sociopolitical drama Boyz n the Hood earn the 23-year-old the accolade of becoming both the first African-American and youngest person to receive a Best Director nomination at the Academy Awards, it more importantly changed the way in which the impoverished black youth of America were perceived amid widespread police brutality and a media frenzy demonising gang culture…

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Revisiting . . . Fargo (1996)

In many ways Fargo is the star of Fargo.

So detached from the savagery of modern life are its people that their salt-of-the-earth simplicity comes across as quite bizarre, and when contrasted with the stark and often brutal violence of the movie’s outsiders, we are plunged into an odyssey that is at once perverse and comical, exactly the kind of prodigious juxtapose that has made the Coen brothers so uniquely prominent as both writers and directors…

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Soldier Boyz (1995)

When it comes to plot lines, you would be hard pressed to find one as improbable as that featured inĀ Soldier Boyz.

Not only are the film’s events about as detached from reality as The Naked Gun, its characters are just as trite and predictable, so hammy that you sometimes forget this is an action movie and not a straight up spoof. Even more amazing is the fact that Louis Morneau’s slice of puerile patriotism harbours delusions of social commentary, masquerading as a cultural melting pot as America’s gangland minorities team up to take on an even more foreign, and therefore evil race of people…

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Revisiting . . . The Dead Zone (1983)

As a movie, The Dead Zone is not without its flaws, but it proves extremely relevant in regards to today’s political climate.

Although not as high profile as many other Stephen King adaptions, it is one of most loyal in terms of how it translates to the screen, and is certainly one of the most underappreciated, in spite of its often clunky pacing and superfluous content. The movie is directed by none other than David Cronenberg, a man who has long since reached a mainstream audience, although even his more high-profile pictures could never really be classed as conventional…

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Revisiting . . . Boyz n the Hood (1991)

Almost thirty years have passed since the release of John Singleton’s controversial drama, and the movie has lost none of its power. In fact, it is hard to imagine a film of its nature existing in today’s censored climate.

Back in 1991, the infamous L.A. riots were just around the corner, and rap was more than just a vehicle for cynical, white-collar marketing. Thanks to certain creative freedoms, the racially oppressed still had something of a mainstream voice, and movies were allowed to champion unpopular opinions…

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Revisiting . . . Sexy Beast (2000)

The opening scene of Sexy Beast is one of great comical foreboding.

Retired safe-cracker Gal, played with subtle potency by the wonderful Ray Winstone, is your typical Brit abroad, a red lobster baking in the Spanish heat and loving every minute of it. His dysfunctional family consists of his beloved partner Dee Dee, an ex porn star with just as much reason to escape her homeland, another gangland couple with a similarly unfortunate past, and a young Spanish boy who performs chores around Gal’s villa with the adoring smile of an adulating son…

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