Revisiting…Pulp Fiction (1994)

Tarantino’s colossal opus is a near perfect movie. Although it unquestionably defined an era, it refuses to be tied to one, and in a bizarre journey via a 50s themed cafe known as Jack Rabbit Slims, we follow an Afro-wielding gangster and his 70s icon cohort, while an eclectic range of popular music traverses four decades, resulting in an enduring abstraction of time and place…

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Revisiting . . . Juice (1992)

Back in 1991, director John Singleton single-handedly changed the face of cinema.

Not only did his sociopolitical drama Boyz n the Hood earn the 23-year-old the accolade of becoming both the first African-American and youngest person to receive a Best Director nomination at the Academy Awards, it more importantly changed the way in which the impoverished black youth of America were perceived amid widespread police brutality and a media frenzy demonising gang culture…

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Revisiting . . . Fargo (1996)

In many ways Fargo is the star of Fargo.

So detached from the savagery of modern life are its people that their salt-of-the-earth simplicity comes across as quite bizarre, and when contrasted with the stark and often brutal violence of the movie’s outsiders, we are plunged into an odyssey that is at once perverse and comical, exactly the kind of prodigious juxtapose that has made the Coen brothers so uniquely prominent as both writers and directors…

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Revisiting . . . A Simple Plan (1998)

A Simple Plan is one of those movies that is destined to be forgotten.

This is nothing out of the ordinary. There are lots of films that disappear from the public consciousness, but few of them are as enjoyable as this one, and even fewer can boast such an exceptional cast or a director as consistent as horror icon Sam Raimi, who makes something of a departure from his usual comic book style with this taut and suspenseful thriller . . .

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Revisiting . . . True Romance (1993)

In 1995 actors and directors were queuing up to work with a young prodigy by the name of Quentin Tarantino.

In 1992 he gave us the star-studded heist flick Reservoir Dogs, a near scene-for-scene remake of the 1985 Hong Kong action film City on Fire, which although veiled with western pop culture references inspired cries of plagiarism from educated critics across the globe.

Nevertheless, there was no doubting QT’s talent and potential…

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Revisiting . . . Boyz n the Hood (1991)

Almost thirty years have passed since the release of John Singleton’s controversial drama, and the movie has lost none of its power. In fact, it is hard to imagine a film of its nature existing in today’s censored climate.

Back in 1991, the infamous L.A. riots were just around the corner, and rap was more than just a vehicle for cynical, white-collar marketing. Thanks to certain creative freedoms, the racially oppressed still had something of a mainstream voice, and movies were allowed to champion unpopular opinions…

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Revisiting . . . Sexy Beast (2000)

The opening scene of Sexy Beast is one of great comical foreboding.

Retired safe-cracker Gal, played with subtle potency by the wonderful Ray Winstone, is your typical Brit abroad, a red lobster baking in the Spanish heat and loving every minute of it. His dysfunctional family consists of his beloved partner Dee Dee, an ex porn star with just as much reason to escape her homeland, another gangland couple with a similarly unfortunate past, and a young Spanish boy who performs chores around Gal’s villa with the adoring smile of an adulating son…

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