When Enough is Enough: Halloween II and the Curse of the Horror Sequel

When is enough enough? In an era of reboots, prequels, sequels and expanding cinematic universes, it seems that the answer is never.

Sequels have been around in some capacity for as long as mainstream cinema has existed. The golden age of horror would set the proverbial ball rolling, monsters such as Frankenstein returning time after time to meet popular demand. If something is marketable then let’s make more of it. It’s standard business practice.[…]

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This Boy’s Knife: Ranking the Original Halloween Series

In the weird and wonderful annals of horror filmmaking, few have left a cultural impression quite like Michael Myers. In the hand’s of creator John Carpenter, Haddonfield’s most infamous offspring was a colossal figure: patient, elusive and as swift and brutal as they come.

Down the years, it all got just a little bit silly, but in spite of The Shape’s dwindling mystique we followed him through thick and thin, hoping that […]

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Halloween Resurrection (2002)

Much has been made about what New Line Cinema did to the Friday the 13th franchise.

In their pursuit of a money-spinning Freddy vs Jason crossover they ignored the key ingredient of the series: simple repetition. Friday the 13th was the first horror franchise to make the ‘more of the same’ concept key to its success, but with their body-swapping debut Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday all that went out of the window. Some feel their second effort Jason X was another insult to the Paramount formula, while others disagree. Whatever you may think, though it shot Jason into space and tried something novel for the most part it went back to basics and retained many of the ingredients that made the original series a success. The same can not be said about Dimension Films […]

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When Carpenter Met Craven: Halloween H20’s Unholy Alliance

Back in the mid-90s, Wes Craven’s Scream changed the face of horror cinema.

In 1994 the cult director would test the meta-concept in Wes Craven’s New Nightmare, a movie which saw pop culture farce Fred Krueger return to the dark side and cross over into the realms of reality. The idea of Robert Englund’s ‘bastard child of a thousand maniacs’ stalking the cast of the original movie was enough to salvage the once fearsome character’s languishing credibility, but the concept wasn’t enough to catch mainstream fire all by itself […]

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